National Archives Draft Strategic Plan for FY 2018-2022

The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) announced a Draft Strategic Plan for Fiscal Years 2018-2022 in August, and has just issued its revised plan, based on public and staff comments. This is a process that every federal agency goes through every four years.

One of the goals is to digitize 500 million pages of records and make them available through our online Catalog. This is ambitious; there are about 37 million images in the Catalog currently.

The future: it will be interesting. Never a doubt about that.

Andersonville Prison Records

Researchers who find mention of the Confederate prison, Andersonville, in their ancestor’s Compiled Military Service Record (CMSR) or pension file should be interested in taking the next logical step in their research.

Andersonville prison records that were microfilmed as National Archives Microfilm Publication 1303, Selected Records of the War Department Commissary General of Prisoners Relating to Federal Prisoners of War Confined at Andersonville, Georgia, 1864-65, and can be found digitized online at FamilySearch.org at https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2019835, as well as at Ancestry.com.

In addition, it’s worth checking the “Claims Made for Money Taken from Federal Prisoners of War Confined in Confederate Prisons, 1866–1867,” https://catalog.archives.gov/id/615449, to see if the ancestor filed a claim. There is only a small possibility of this, because the opportunity to make a claim was not well known. My article about these records – “The Rebs Took My Money!” – is online here: https://twelvekey.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/ngsmagazine2015-04.pdf.

William Marvel’s book, Andersonville: The Last Depot, is an excellent book on life at Andersonville, and solidly grounded in archival research.

2016 NARA Virtual Genealogy Fair, Oct. 26-27, Online

The schedule for the 2016 National Archives Virtual Genealogy Fair is now available, and by the time the fair starts, all the presenters’ handouts and PowerPoint presentations will be available online, too.

If you missed the 2013-2015 online fairs, not to worry! They’re still online – video, handouts, PowerPoints – just go to the 2016 Fair page and follow the links under past fair posters.

poster-l.jpg

Gen-Fed Tales of Discovery, 2016

Malissa Ruffner, Director of Gen-Fed, the unique week-long course on using federal records in the National Archives for genealogical research, recently posted a list of “Tales of Discovery” by members of the Gen-Fed Class of 2016. The discoveries they made were in original paper records that are not online and not on microfilm. Their findings broke through brick walls, shattered erroneous conclusions made by others, and enriched their understanding of their ancestors’ lives and times. Fabulous stuff.

There’s no substitute for going beyond the “easy” online pickings to the harder-to-find or harder-to-access offline material.

There’s not enough time in the day, or in one’s life, to research everything, so one strategy is to focus on those ancestors or family groups that are most dear to you, and learn as much as you can about them. And then publish–or your work will perish.