Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists, USCIS Webinar, Tues., March 21, 1 p.m. Eastern

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists

Tuesday, March 21, 1:00 PM Eastern

If you’re interested in passenger lists, particularly 20th century ones, you won’t want to miss the next USCIS webinar by Marian Smith. Understanding the who, what, where, and why of records is always critical.

In this webinar, Marian Smith will revive and update a 2006 presentation about understanding passenger list arrival records (originally titled “Making Sense of Immigration Passenger Lists”).  Topics include the availability of such records (what survived, how complete), how they were created (by whom, how, and where), and how assumptions we make can help or hinder research success. Set a reminder on this webinar.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join us live.  

Attend Session

For more information and how to submit questions for the next “Your Questions” webinar, click this link: “Worth Repeating” Webinar.

The Forgotten Irish: Irish Emigrant Experiences in America – Thursday, March 16, 2017, 7 p.m.

On the eve of the Civil War, 1.6 million Irish-born people were living in the United States, most in the major industrialized cities of the North. For The Forgotten Irish, Damian Shiels researched Civil War pension records to craft the stories of 35 Irish families whose lives portray the nature of the Irish emigrant experience. This will be the book’s U.S. launch.

Michael Hussey, a National Archives archivist and historian, and David T. Gleeson, Professor of American History at Northumbria University and author of The Green and the Gray: The Irish in the Confederate States of America, will co-moderate the discussion and audience Q&A. A book signing will follow the program.

You can view it live from the comfort of your home on YouTube or see it in person by reserving a seat in the William G. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, 700 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Washington, DC.

These authors’ research shows the truly international value and importance of records in the U.S. National Archives. You can subscribe to the National Archives Event Newsletter to receive timely information about future programs.

Damian Shiels blogs at Irish in the American Civil War and David T. Gleeson blogs at The Atlantic Irish.

Thinking Across Time: Researching USCIS Records, 24 January 2017, webinar

It’s no exaggeration to say that Marian L. Smith is undoubtedly the most knowledgeable person on the planet about records created by the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (USCIS since 2003). So you won’t want to miss the next webinar sponsored by our friends at the USCIS History Office and Library:

Tuesday, January 24, 2017, 1 p.m. Eastern

 Thinking Across Time: Researching USCIS Records

In this presentation US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) historical records expert Marian L. Smith will showcase late 19th and 20th century US immigration and nationality records.  She will also discuss how using a timeline can help one predict what immigration and naturalization records may exist for a given immigrant, and how to request records from USCIS.

Direct Link to Webinar Room – enter just prior to 1:00 pm Eastern on Tuesday, January 24th

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live!

What is the “Worth Repeating” Webinar?

During 2017 this bi-monthly webinar will revisit some of the most successful presentations delivered to historical and genealogical audiences over the last 20+ years.  The focus will remain on historical immigration and nationality records created by the legacy Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and found today either at the National Archives or USCIS.

Cishistory.library@uscis.dhs.gov
USCIS History and Genealogy Site

A Look at Inauguration Day Through the Years: Inaugural Photographs and Facts

The U.S. Constitution only stipulates the date and time of the inauguration, as well as the words of the Presidential Oath of Office. Given this lack of detail, traditions surrounding the U.S. Presidential Inauguration have grown and evolved since Washington’s 1789 inauguration. In a look back at past inaugural ceremonies, the NARA Still Picture Staff presents photographs and facts covering Inauguration Day celebrations and traditions throughout the years in A Look at Inauguration Day Through the Years: Inaugural Photographs and Facts.

Minor’s Naturalization

While we normally think of naturalization as a two step process whereby the alien first declares his intent to become a citizen and then petitions for naturalization, there were exceptions to that procedure.

For example, from 1824 to 1906, aliens who came to the U.S. while under age 18 could effectively declare their intent to become a citizen at the same time they filed their petition for naturalization once they had reached age 21 or more and had lived in the U.S. for five years (three of which as a minor). Let the law speak for itself:

image002.jpgSo, to summarize: the alien still had to meet the five year requirement for residency, and three years of that had to be while he was a minor.

Many courts used specific forms for these cases that combined declaration of intent language and petition language in one document, and they made sure to include the word “minor.”  Some may say the applicant “arrived as a minor,” while others will have the words “Minor Naturalization” emblazoned across the title or as a watermark.

For more on naturalization, see Naturalization Records and Women and Naturalization, Part I and Part II.

Burial Flags for U.S. Military Veterans

Today, when a U.S. military veteran dies, we take it for granted that the federal government will provide the next of kin with a U.S. flag to drape over the casket during funeral services. Obtaining this flag is one of the many routine tasks performed by funeral homes for grieving families.

But, did you know this? — The tradition of federally-funded flags for most veterans dates back only to the 1920s! You can read more about it in Records of Burial Flags for Veterans, NGS Magazine, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Oct.-Dec. 2016): 39-42.

flagdrapedcasket