USCIS Webinar: ‘Any Alien’ serving in the military or naval forces of the United States? Asian immigrant soldiers and naturalization during the First World War – Wednesday, 25 April 2018, 1 p.m. (Eastern)

An historian from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will present another useful webinar next Wednesday, 25 April 2018, at 1 p.m.

*This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.*

During the First World War, Congress passed an act that said any alien serving in the U.S. armed forces could become a citizen through an expedited naturalization process. Alongside other foreign-born soldiers, Asian immigrants serving in the U.S. military moved to take advantage of this opportunity.

U.S. naturalization laws, however, had long categorized Asian immigrants as racially ineligible for naturalization and many courts refused to make them citizens under the military naturalization law. For nearly two decades after the war, Asian immigrant soldiers fought to have their right to U.S. citizenship legally recognized.

 This webinar uses archival records and actual case files to tell the story of Asian immigrant WWI soldiers who sought U.S. citizenship under military naturalization provisions.

How to Attend:

1.  Visit the USCIS History and Genealogy webpage.

2.  Click “Guide to I&N History: Wednesday, April 25.”

3.  Click “Attend Session” just before the webinar start time at 1 p.m. (Eastern).  I recommend “arriving” about 10 minutes before in case you need to download any software or have other computer issues to resolve. 

 

 

 

Webinar: “World War I Repatriations” on Thursday, October 26, 2017, 1 p.m. Eastern.

An historian from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will present a webinar on Thursday, October 26, 2017, at 1 p.m. Eastern time., on World War I Repatriations. THIS WEBINAR WILL NOT BE RECORDED.

Did you know that hundreds of native-born and naturalized Americans lost their U.S. citizenship by serving in the armed forces of an allied country during WWI? Whether eager to join the Allied cause before the U.S. entered the war or wishing to fight in their native countries, many Americans joined foreign allied armies. Most desired to remain U.S. citizens and were even unaware that their enlistment had stripped them of their citizenship. To aid these expatriated Americans, Congress passed the Act of October 5, 1917, which allowed them to take the Oath of Renunciation Allegiance and reassume U.S. citizenship.

This webinar will use real case file examples to explore how Americans who were expatriated through service in the armed forces of an allied country during WWI regained their U.S. citizenship.

How to Attend

1.  Visit the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ (USCIS) History and Genealogy web page.

2.  Click “Guide to I&N History: Thursday, Oct 26.”

3.  Click “Attend Session” just before the webinar start time at 1 p.m. Eastern.

“Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I , USCIS webinar today, June 29, 2017, 1 p.m.

From the USCIS History Office:

I&N History Webinar: “Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I

The First World War inspired patriotism in both native-born and immigrant Americans. At the same time, some immigrant groups fell under suspicion of being disloyal to the U.S. war effort. So, in the years surrounding the war, the Bureau of Naturalization investigated the loyalty of naturalizing immigrants to ensure that only fully qualified immigrants became citizens.

As part of the USCIS History Office’s ongoing commemoration of the 100th anniversary of World War I, this webinar examines the Bureau of Naturalization’s loyalty investigations during the war and the Bureau’s efforts to revoke citizenship from naturalized citizens it deemed disloyal. In the webinar, you will learn about the Bureau’s wartime activities through primary-source examples of loyalty investigation files and cancelled certificate of naturalization files.

To join the webinar, find the June 29 webinar “Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I and click “Attend Session” just before it starts at 1 p.m. Eastern on Thursday, June 29.

Please note: This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.