USCIS Webinar: ‘Any Alien’ serving in the military or naval forces of the United States? Asian immigrant soldiers and naturalization during the First World War – Wednesday, 25 April 2018, 1 p.m. (Eastern)

An historian from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will present another useful webinar next Wednesday, 25 April 2018, at 1 p.m.

*This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.*

During the First World War, Congress passed an act that said any alien serving in the U.S. armed forces could become a citizen through an expedited naturalization process. Alongside other foreign-born soldiers, Asian immigrants serving in the U.S. military moved to take advantage of this opportunity.

U.S. naturalization laws, however, had long categorized Asian immigrants as racially ineligible for naturalization and many courts refused to make them citizens under the military naturalization law. For nearly two decades after the war, Asian immigrant soldiers fought to have their right to U.S. citizenship legally recognized.

 This webinar uses archival records and actual case files to tell the story of Asian immigrant WWI soldiers who sought U.S. citizenship under military naturalization provisions.

How to Attend:

1.  Visit the USCIS History and Genealogy webpage.

2.  Click “Guide to I&N History: Wednesday, April 25.”

3.  Click “Attend Session” just before the webinar start time at 1 p.m. (Eastern).  I recommend “arriving” about 10 minutes before in case you need to download any software or have other computer issues to resolve. 

 

 

 

Review of “Married at Ellis Island….”

If you missed last Tuesday’s USCIS History Office webinar, “Married at Ellis Island…., 1892-1924,” you missed a good one. I won’t review all the details, but here are a few tidbits: It’s estimated that perhaps 300 women a year “married at Ellis Island” to their intended spouse in lieu of deportation on the grounds of “likely to become a public charge” or risk of falling into prostitution. The “Record of Detained Aliens” (title may vary) that follows the regular passenger lists for a given vessel (on microfilm or online) may have the notation “married” or similar words as a part of the information for the detained woman. The marriage record will be found in the New York City marriage records for that period which are online on Ancestry.com. A marriage on the alien woman’s date of arrival or during the day(s) she was detained is a good clue that the marriage happened “at Ellis Island” and was a requirement for her admission to the United States.

“Married at Ellis Island:” Single Women and Immigration, 1892-1924 – Webinar, Tuesday, March 27, 2017, 1 p.m. Eastern

During Ellis Island’s peak years, unmarried immigrant women faced extra scrutiny when entering the United States. Women who traveled with companions to whom they were not married were deemed susceptible to “immoral” activities. Single women who travelled alone and had no relatives to meet them were often seen as “likely to become a public charge.” If the women married, however, they became admissible immigrants. As a result, hundreds of immigrants were married on Ellis Island.

This U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) webinar, presented by an agency historian, uses real case files to explore Ellis Island marriages in the context of the era’s immigration policies.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.

Go to the Worth Repeating Webinars, choose the March 27 session, then hit the “Attend Session” button. It’s good to get there about 5 to 10 minutes in advance to make sure you are connecting successfully.

 

1940 Alien Registration Forms: USCIS Webinar, Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 1 p.m. Eastern.

On Tuesday…. If the Federal Government is open for business, I highly recommend this webinar by one of the USCIS historians.  (If the Federal Government is closed, we’ll have to wait to see when it is rescheduled.)

1940 Alien Registration Forms:   USCIS Webinar: Tuesday, January 23, 1:00 PM Eastern

When researching early 20th century immigrants who did not naturalize (at least not before World War II), Alien Registration Forms from 1940 can provide important information. This webinar will focus on the 1940 Alien Registration Program and the forms used as part of that program.

Alien Registration Forms

Topics include:

The Alien Registration Act of 1940, and its purpose and requirements;

The registration process, followed by all non-citizens age 14 and older who lived in or entered the United States between August 1940 and April 1944;

Examining various registration forms, including information collected and how these records can help break through research roadblocks;

Indexing of the forms and ways to identify an early alien registration number (A-Number); and

Where to find alien registration forms today, and how to request them.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join us live. To attend the session, go to https://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars click on “Worth Repeating Webinar: Tuesday, January 23” then click on the “Attend Session” button just before 1 p.m. Eastern. 

Chinese Exclusion Act Files and Records Overview – USCIS webinar, Thursday, Nov. 30, at 1 p.m. Eastern

Chinese Exclusion Act Files and Records Overview

Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017, 1 p.m. Eastern

Join Marian Smith for an overview of U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Chinese Exclusion Act records and where those records can be found today.  The presentation will use a timeline to discuss a variety of Chinese Exclusion Act records inherited or created by INS.  These records are today found at regional archives, the National Archives in Washington, DC, and occasionally in files held by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services  (USCIS).  The webinar will address the agency’s historical practice of moving some files to other file series as well as USCIS resources available to those doing Chinese Exclusion-era immigrant research.

*This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.*

 How to Attend

1.  Visit the USCIS History and Genealogy web page.

2.  Click “Worth Repeating Webinar: Thursday, November 30.”

3.  Click “Attend Session” just before the webinar start time at 1 p.m. Eastern.

Chinese Laws and Rules

Researchers using historical Chinese Exclusion records often find themselves trying to navigate through a maze of legal citations and references to the multitude of laws, rules, and regulations that governed the admission and exclusion of Chinese immigrants. For example, what was a “Section 6 Certificate?” Or, what did it mean if someone was admitted as part of the “exempt class under Rule 9?”

Fortunately, the USCIS History Office and Library’s online catalog provides full-text access to tools that can help researchers interpret Chinese Exclusion files. Two of the most important are the Chinese Laws and Rules (1899–1936) and the Chinese General Orders (1924–1945).

The Chinese laws and rules, which the Immigration Service distributed to officers responsible for enforcing Chinese Exclusion law, initially included a list of laws governing the admission of Chinese and a compilation of major court decisions interpreting those laws. As Congress amended the laws or added new ones, the Immigration Service issued new volumes of the publication. In 1908, the Immigration Service added a list of regulations (rules) to the publication, which detailed how the agency carried out the law. The rules described the inspections process, various certificates and forms required under the law, and several other aspects of Chinese Exclusion enforcement. Today, the laws and rules help us interpret legal citations found in Chinese Exclusion files and provide a fuller picture of how Chinese Exclusion law was carried out.

In 1924, the Immigration Service supplemented the Chinese laws and rules with the Chinese general orders. The general orders announced changes to the Chinese rules and were later added to the next printed addition of the laws and rules. Today they are helpful for pinpointing changes in the rules.

To find both the Chinese laws and rules and the Chinese general orders in the USCIS History Office and Library’s online catalog, simply click the links above or select “Simple Search” from the “Search” drop-down menu and type “Chinese rules.” They will come up as the first two search results. 

“Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I , USCIS webinar today, June 29, 2017, 1 p.m.

From the USCIS History Office:

I&N History Webinar: “Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I

The First World War inspired patriotism in both native-born and immigrant Americans. At the same time, some immigrant groups fell under suspicion of being disloyal to the U.S. war effort. So, in the years surrounding the war, the Bureau of Naturalization investigated the loyalty of naturalizing immigrants to ensure that only fully qualified immigrants became citizens.

As part of the USCIS History Office’s ongoing commemoration of the 100th anniversary of World War I, this webinar examines the Bureau of Naturalization’s loyalty investigations during the war and the Bureau’s efforts to revoke citizenship from naturalized citizens it deemed disloyal. In the webinar, you will learn about the Bureau’s wartime activities through primary-source examples of loyalty investigation files and cancelled certificate of naturalization files.

To join the webinar, find the June 29 webinar “Disloyalty,” Naturalization, and World War I and click “Attend Session” just before it starts at 1 p.m. Eastern on Thursday, June 29.

Please note: This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists, USCIS Webinar, Tues., March 21, 1 p.m. Eastern

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists

Tuesday, March 21, 1:00 PM Eastern

If you’re interested in passenger lists, particularly 20th century ones, you won’t want to miss the next USCIS webinar by Marian Smith. Understanding the who, what, where, and why of records is always critical.

In this webinar, Marian Smith will revive and update a 2006 presentation about understanding passenger list arrival records (originally titled “Making Sense of Immigration Passenger Lists”).  Topics include the availability of such records (what survived, how complete), how they were created (by whom, how, and where), and how assumptions we make can help or hinder research success. Set a reminder on this webinar.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join us live.  

Attend Session

For more information and how to submit questions for the next “Your Questions” webinar, click this link: “Worth Repeating” Webinar.