Mrs. Kaney and the Philadelphia Immigration Business, 1882-1909, USCIS Webinar, May 23, 2017, 1 p.m. (EDT)

historical research branch communication

Mrs. Kaney and the Philadelphia Immigration Business, 1882-1909

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Tuesday, May 23, 1 p.m. Eastern

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is unique among American ports of entry because records survive to document nearly every activity of immigration authorities during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Also, Philadelphia is different from Ellis Island at New York because the Philadelphia immigration station was not entirely self-contained. Philadelphia immigration officials depended on local steamship lines, railroad companies and a variety of government contractors to handle everyday business. Due to its complex relationship with the surrounding community, a study of Philadelphia’s immigration business can help us understand immigrant processing of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Using detailed records surviving at the National Archives in Philadelphia and in Washington, D.C., Marian Smith will discuss immigrant processing operations in Philadelphia between approximately 1882 and 1909. She will also introduce us to the persons and personalities involved, such as Mrs. Alice Kaney.

To attend, follow this link: April – September 2017 Live Webinars Schedule and bookmark it!

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists, USCIS Webinar, Tues., March 21, 1 p.m. Eastern

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists

Tuesday, March 21, 1:00 PM Eastern

If you’re interested in passenger lists, particularly 20th century ones, you won’t want to miss the next USCIS webinar by Marian Smith. Understanding the who, what, where, and why of records is always critical.

In this webinar, Marian Smith will revive and update a 2006 presentation about understanding passenger list arrival records (originally titled “Making Sense of Immigration Passenger Lists”).  Topics include the availability of such records (what survived, how complete), how they were created (by whom, how, and where), and how assumptions we make can help or hinder research success. Set a reminder on this webinar.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join us live.  

Attend Session

For more information and how to submit questions for the next “Your Questions” webinar, click this link: “Worth Repeating” Webinar.

USCIS Genealogy Program Fee Increase, Dec. 23.

If you’ve put off requesting information on 20th century immigrant ancestors who may have more records than a simple passenger list, do not procrastinate. Request an index search by December 22, 2016.

From our friends at USCIS….

USCIS will increase most filing fees on December 23, 2016.

Forms postmarked or filed on or after that date must include the new fees or we will not be able to accept them.

The new fees for Form G-1041, Genealogy Index Search Request, and Form G-1041A, Genealogy Records Request, will be $65.

Our agency is funded almost entirely by fees. By law, we conduct a fee review every two years to ensure that we recover the full cost of processing immigration benefits. The Genealogy program has not increased its fees since the program was created in 2008.

If you have any questions, please write to Genealogy.USCIS@uscis.dhs.gov.