If You Value History…. Take Action

If you value historic records, historic sites, the teaching of history in schools, and the like, the National Coalition for History has a request for you: Ask your Member of Congress to join the Congressional History Caucus.  (If they are already a member, thank them.) Then, ask your genealogy-minded and history-minded friends to do likewise. Contact them by email! Phone! Postal mail!

The National Coalition for History (NCH) is a consortium of over 50 organizations that advocates on federal, state and local legislative and regulatory issues. The coalition is made up of a diverse number of groups representing historians, archivists, researchers, teachers, students, documentary editors, preservationists, genealogists, political scientists, museum professionals and other stakeholders. In other words, they are lobbyists FOR history with these priorities.

Who will speak for history if YOU don’t make your voice heard? Help NCH lobby FOR history by making your Representatives and Senators know you care about preserving records and historic sites.

Since 1982, the NCH (formerly the National Coordinating Committee for the Promotion of History) has served as the voice for the historical community in Washington. The NCH seeks to encourage the study and appreciation of history by serving as a clearinghouse of information about the profession and as a facilitator on behalf of the interests of our diverse constituency.

The NCH is a non-profit organization organized under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. NCH is solely supported by contributions from its member organizations and the general public.

P.S. Any advertisements that appear on this website/blog benefit WordPress, not me. Also, my opinions are my own and are not intended to represent the policies of any organization with which I may be affiliated. Just FYI.

Federal Laws Online

I needed to hunt down federal laws a few times in recent weeks, so make it easier on myself and others to find online links, I’m posting them here.

High school civics lesson reminder: Federal laws are passed by Congress, then approved by the President. If the President vetoes (disapproves) the legislation, it can still become law if the Congress overrides the veto by a two-thirds vote in each chamber. Once they are the law of the land, they are published in the Statutes at Large.

Digital copies of the Statutes at Large can be conveniently found online at four websites listed below. (The links take you directly to the right place on each website.) There is some overlap between the sites, and you may find you like the interface on one better than the other.