Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists, USCIS Webinar, Tues., March 21, 1 p.m. Eastern

Fact, Fiction, and Immigration Passenger Lists

Tuesday, March 21, 1:00 PM Eastern

If you’re interested in passenger lists, particularly 20th century ones, you won’t want to miss the next USCIS webinar by Marian Smith. Understanding the who, what, where, and why of records is always critical.

In this webinar, Marian Smith will revive and update a 2006 presentation about understanding passenger list arrival records (originally titled “Making Sense of Immigration Passenger Lists”).  Topics include the availability of such records (what survived, how complete), how they were created (by whom, how, and where), and how assumptions we make can help or hinder research success. Set a reminder on this webinar.

This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join us live.  

Attend Session

For more information and how to submit questions for the next “Your Questions” webinar, click this link: “Worth Repeating” Webinar.

Minor’s Naturalization

While we normally think of naturalization as a two step process whereby the alien first declares his intent to become a citizen and then petitions for naturalization, there were exceptions to that procedure.

For example, from 1824 to 1906, aliens who came to the U.S. while under age 18 could effectively declare their intent to become a citizen at the same time they filed their petition for naturalization once they had reached age 21 or more and had lived in the U.S. for five years (three of which as a minor). Let the law speak for itself:

image002.jpgSo, to summarize: the alien still had to meet the five year requirement for residency, and three years of that had to be while he was a minor.

Many courts used specific forms for these cases that combined declaration of intent language and petition language in one document, and they made sure to include the word “minor.”  Some may say the applicant “arrived as a minor,” while others will have the words “Minor Naturalization” emblazoned across the title or as a watermark.

For more on naturalization, see Naturalization Records and Women and Naturalization, Part I and Part II.