Remembering Ernie Pyle

Among the many heroes of World War II were the journalists who risked their lives to cover the war and allow the “folks back home” to understand what was happening from an overall view as well as from the up close and personal view of the boys on the front line. Ernie Pyle was a war correspondent who was embedded (as we now say) with Marines. He lost his life during the Battle of Okinawa on 18 April 1945. In the blog post “Spotlight: Remembering Ernie Pyle”  the staff of the National Archives highlight some of the photographic and video recordings that include this wonderful writer.

USCIS Webinar: ‘Any Alien’ serving in the military or naval forces of the United States? Asian immigrant soldiers and naturalization during the First World War – Wednesday, 25 April 2018, 1 p.m. (Eastern)

An historian from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) will present another useful webinar next Wednesday, 25 April 2018, at 1 p.m.

*This webinar will not be recorded, so be sure to join it live.*

During the First World War, Congress passed an act that said any alien serving in the U.S. armed forces could become a citizen through an expedited naturalization process. Alongside other foreign-born soldiers, Asian immigrants serving in the U.S. military moved to take advantage of this opportunity.

U.S. naturalization laws, however, had long categorized Asian immigrants as racially ineligible for naturalization and many courts refused to make them citizens under the military naturalization law. For nearly two decades after the war, Asian immigrant soldiers fought to have their right to U.S. citizenship legally recognized.

 This webinar uses archival records and actual case files to tell the story of Asian immigrant WWI soldiers who sought U.S. citizenship under military naturalization provisions.

How to Attend:

1.  Visit the USCIS History and Genealogy webpage.

2.  Click “Guide to I&N History: Wednesday, April 25.”

3.  Click “Attend Session” just before the webinar start time at 1 p.m. (Eastern).  I recommend “arriving” about 10 minutes before in case you need to download any software or have other computer issues to resolve. 

 

 

 

Review of “Married at Ellis Island….”

If you missed last Tuesday’s USCIS History Office webinar, “Married at Ellis Island…., 1892-1924,” you missed a good one. I won’t review all the details, but here are a few tidbits: It’s estimated that perhaps 300 women a year “married at Ellis Island” to their intended spouse in lieu of deportation on the grounds of “likely to become a public charge” or risk of falling into prostitution. The “Record of Detained Aliens” (title may vary) that follows the regular passenger lists for a given vessel (on microfilm or online) may have the notation “married” or similar words as a part of the information for the detained woman. The marriage record will be found in the New York City marriage records for that period which are online on Ancestry.com. A marriage on the alien woman’s date of arrival or during the day(s) she was detained is a good clue that the marriage happened “at Ellis Island” and was a requirement for her admission to the United States.