Minor’s Naturalization

While we normally think of naturalization as a two step process whereby the alien first declares his intent to become a citizen and then petitions for naturalization, there were exceptions to that procedure.

For example, from 1824 to 1906, aliens who came to the U.S. while under age 18 could effectively declare their intent to become a citizen at the same time they filed their petition for naturalization once they had reached age 21 or more and had lived in the U.S. for five years (three of which as a minor). Let the law speak for itself:

image002.jpgSo, to summarize: the alien still had to meet the five year requirement for residency, and three years of that had to be while he was a minor.

Many courts used specific forms for these cases that combined declaration of intent language and petition language in one document, and they made sure to include the word “minor.”  Some may say the applicant “arrived as a minor,” while others will have the words “Minor Naturalization” emblazoned across the title or as a watermark.

For more on naturalization, see Naturalization Records and Women and Naturalization, Part I and Part II.

Burial Flags for U.S. Military Veterans

Today, when a U.S. military veteran dies, we take it for granted that the federal government will provide the next of kin with a U.S. flag to drape over the casket during funeral services. Obtaining this flag is one of the many routine tasks performed by funeral homes for grieving families.

But, did you know this? — The tradition of federally-funded flags for most veterans dates back only to the 1920s! You can read more about it in Records of Burial Flags for Veterans, NGS Magazine, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Oct.-Dec. 2016): 39-42.

flagdrapedcasket

Accidental Genealogy! Jan. 10-11, 2017

I suspect that my colleague, Ray Bottorf, has come up with some interesting stuff. You can watch … live … or later… on YouTube…

Tuesday, January 10, 2017, at 2 p.m. EST, William G. McGowan Theater at Archives I & View on YouTube 

Accidental Genealogy—Part 1 of 2  Learn about various genealogy sources from Ray Bottorf, Jr., as he describes valuable information accidentally found in our records, including records regarding military permissions to marry, deceased military personnel, and military personnel passenger lists. This is a two-part series. Presentation materials available at www.archives.gov/calendar/know-your-records.

Wednesday, January 11, 2017, at 2 p.m. EST, William G. McGowan Theater at Archives I & View on YouTube 

Accidental Genealogy—Part 2 of 2  Ray Bottorff, Jr., returns to describe valuable information accidentally found in our records, focusing on records from the Selective Service System. Presentation materials available at www.archives.gov/calendar/know-your-records.